I found my copy of Saint Patrick  in the vast and vaguely arranged “Religion” section of my favorite used bookstore, and based upon the cover, size and topic of the book, I expected a snappy, action-packed narrative—the man was captured by pirates, after all. What I found instead was a drier, somewhat academic story, with details on the relationship between Ireland, England and the Roman Empire. There were pirates, but not of the swash-buckling sort. High seas, but not a whole lot of adventure upon them.

So why, you ask, do I recommend a book that I just described with words like “dry” and “academic”? For that, I refer you to Charlotte Mason:

It is a great thing to possess a pageant of history in the background of one’s thoughts. We may not be able to recall this or that circumstance, but “the imagination is warmed” . . . The present becomes enriched with the wealth of all that has gone before.

– quoted in When Children Love to Learn, ed. Elaine Cooper

Saint Patrick | Little Book, Big Story

Reading biographies to our children is a great way to color this “pageant of history,” and biographies like Saint Patrick, though not dressed up for quick consumption, contain the depth and detail that make a figure’s story breathe. This book is only half biography, with the last half of  the book dedicated to Saint Patrick’s own writing. That was a treat: I found it quite enjoyable to read his works with the memory of his biography fresh in my mind.

Saint Patrick | Little Book, Big Story

Some of you have kids who will love reading Patrick’s story straight from the pages of this chapter book, while others have children who might benefit more if you read it for yourself and then livened it up by telling the story aloud. Either way, the faithfulness of God runs right through the middle of Patrick’s life, and his obedience sowed seeds that bore a bounty of fruit over the course of generations. His is a story worth remembering, and I’m thankful that a series like “Christian Encounters” puts the biographies of figures like John Bunyan, Jane Austen and Isaac Newton upon our family’s shelves.


Saint Patrick
Jonathan Rogers (2010)

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